Featured Posts
People living with a mental illness

People living with a mental illness

Mental illness can affect anyone at any time. Difficulties may be short term following a personal trauma or crisis, or longer term needing more specialist help and support Download Information

Download Information

People that require tracheotomy care

People that require tracheotomy care

A Tracheotomy is fitted to assist breathing when the upper airway is obstructed for whatever reason

Download Information

People with sensory impairment

People with sensory impairment

Unlike physical disabilities, sensory impairments can be hard to detect. A sensory impairment can be anything that affects the five main senses; however, the most common are hearing and visual impairments.

Download Information

People living with dementia

People living with dementia

There are about 750,000 people in the UK with dementia and this is expected to double over the next 40 years. It's more likely to affect people over 65, but can affect younger people

Download Information

People living with physical disabilities

People living with physical disabilities

There are over 10 million people in the UK with a long term, impairment or disability. The most common disabilities are those that affect how you move, including how you lift and carry things.

Download Information

Elderly people

Elderly people

Elderly people About 3.5 million older people (65+) live alone.

Download Information

Contact Us

WIICARE LIMITED

Request
Call back

NewsWii Care will always continue to keep you up dated

MSP raises fears that nursing cost pressures could lead to further reduction in staff
MOUNTING cost pressures could lead to a further reduction in nursing staff, the Health Secretary was told today.Labour MSP Dr Richard Simpson raised his concern with Nicola Sturgeon as Holyrood’s Health and Sport Committee rubber-stamped a plan to lift payments for personal and nursing care by 2.5 per cent.Dr Simpson, a committee member, welcomed the increase but warned that costs are likely to increase by as much as five per cent.

It follows a report by the Royal College of Nursing which found that staff who leave are not being replaced because of the strain on public finances.

The body said one nurse cares for around nine patients on older people’s wards, which it warned is not enough to provide safe care.

Identifying a “growing gap” in costs and funding, Dr Simpson said: “My concern is that we’ve already had evidence from the Royal College of Nursing of a reduction in the number of qualified nurses in care homes at a time when the level of dependency in those homes is actually increasing.

“I do have concerns that further cost pressures could lead to a further reduction in nursing staff.”

Ms Sturgeon appeared before the committee to win approval for increases to weekly payments.

MSPs agreed to lift the funds for personal care by £4 to £163 and to increase additional payments for nursing care by £2 to £74.

Councils will meet the costs of the inflationary increases, totalling about £3 million across all authorities from within their agreed budget, Ms Sturgeon said.

She added: “I recognise there is pressure on the care home sector just as other sectors are under pressure in the financial climate that we face.

“As a government we work as hard as we can with both our local authority partners and with other sectors as well to try to manage those pressures.”

She said there were no increases in the early years of the policy, which the SNP Government has “rectified”. Mounting cost pressures could lead to a further reduction in nursing staff, the Health Secretary was told today.

Labour MSP Dr Richard Simpson raised his concern with Nicola Sturgeon as Holyrood’s Health and Sport Committee rubber-stamped a plan to lift payments for personal and nursing care by 2.5 per cent.

Dr Simpson, a committee member, welcomed the increase but warned that costs are likely to increase by as much as five per cent.

It follows a report by the Royal College of Nursing which found that staff who leave are not being replaced because of the strain on public finances.

The body said one nurse cares for around nine patients on older people’s wards, which it warned is not enough to provide safe care.

Identifying a “growing gap” in costs and funding, Dr Simpson said: “My concern is that we’ve already had evidence from the Royal College of Nursing of a reduction in the number of qualified nurses in care homes at a time when the level of dependency in those homes is actually increasing.

“I do have concerns that further cost pressures could lead to a further reduction in nursing staff.”

Ms Sturgeon appeared before the committee to win approval for increases to weekly payments.

MSPs agreed to lift the funds for personal care by £4 to £163 and to increase additional payments for nursing care by £2 to £74.

Councils will meet the costs of the inflationary increases, totalling about £3 million across all authorities from within their agreed budget, Ms Sturgeon said.

She added: “I recognise there is pressure on the care home sector just as other sectors are under pressure in the financial climate that we face.

“As a government we work as hard as we can with both our local authority partners and with other sectors as well to try to manage those pressures.”

She said there were no increases in the early years of the policy, which the SNP Government has “rectified”.

 

70% of families ‘living on the edge’
Nearly three-quarters of UK families say they are ‘on the edge’ of surviving, with one in five mothers missing meals so their children can eat, according to a survey by Netmums.The parenting website surveyed 2000 of its members this month to investigate how the economic downturn was affecting families around the UK.It revealed 70% said they were living on the edge, with one change – such as childcare costs going up or child tax credits going down – pushing them into hardship.

A quarter of families are living on credit cards, the survey found, while two-thirds said they had less money coming in to their household than at the same point last year.

The survey also found that 16% of parents are currently being treated for a stress-related illness due to money problems, while 15% of families said they were ‘desperate’.

One children and families social worker also told Community Care magazine she had noticed an increase in the number of families struggling to cope because of finanical worries.

“These are difficult times and I’m certainly seeing families who are increasingly stressed about their ability to provide for their children. It is worrying what might happen to children if families become overwhelmed but we’re trying to work with families and support them.

It’s not helpful that frontline social work resources are also stretched though.”

Anne Longfield, chief executive of the charity 4Children, said the survey showed “how deep the government’s austerity measures and the unemployment crisis are biting into the everyday lives of millions of ordinary families”.

She likened the problems to a ticking time bomb and warned the government to act fast.

“Unless the government takes immediate action to ensure that struggling families have the support they need and, in the long term, step up their efforts to stimulate growth in the economy and increase jobs, they will be allowing a ticking time bomb to go off, with untold consequences for family life in Britain.”

The survey follows warnings from campaigners that the government’s welfare reforms will push tens of thousands of children into poverty.

 

NHS is the biggest hand on our wallet
I must confess to finding it depressing that people use a public forum like your letters page last week to threaten an MP or any other elected representative.Given that the decision to support a candidate is almost always private and personal, why does a change of heart have to be strident and public?Of much greater concern, though, is the level of emotional but unexplained opposition to the upcoming Health Bill.  It is as if the very act of attempting to review the NHS is criminal.  It is not.

The NHS is the biggest single item of expenditure on the nation’s ledger, which is not far from saying that it is the biggest hand on our wallet as we approach the Budget.

Against a backdrop of steepling debt, we need politicians who will constantly question whether it is value for money.  We need ministers brave enough to challenge the status quo if it is not.  And finally we need critics who will not simply cry “Foul” but explain to all of us fully and fairly why what is proposed will not work.

The Health Bill is huge.  It runs to literally hundreds of pages even before the thousand-plus amendments tabled since its first reading.  Yet, as of now, there are only three points generally cited or discussed:

1. The primary care trusts are going to be phased out.

2. GPs are to be in charge of commissioning secondary care for their patients, and

3. £20 billion of efficiency savings need to be found as the sector’s contribution towards solving the wider economic malaise.

Whether separately or together, I genuinely struggle to see how these can be interpreted as a lethal assault on the health service or as undermining its status, firmly in the public sector.

The PCTs will be replaced by something more local in flavour, which will include proper local authority oversight; the doctors – who remain contracted to the State to provide frontline care – will simply not be allowed to write cosy, lucrative contracts with private providers.

And as for seeking billions in savings and efficiencies, I’d be calling for heads and threatening to donate my vote to UKIP if they weren’t made.

I am an NHS heart patient whose recovery was compromised by being given MRSA in the immediate aftermath of an operation.  I have been in and out of NHS hospitals for 12 years and am well aware of their strengths – but also of glaring weaknesses.

By no means is everything broke, but, believe me, there is plenty that needs fixing.

 

We are working hard to get our site up and running in the summer of 2011.
Want to receive a notification and other Wiicare news? Sign up for our newsletter!

Subscribe For Newsletter
* = required field